The Myrtle Baptist Church of West Newton

Rev. Brandon Thomas Crowley, MDiv, STM | Senior Pastor
Rev. Howard Haywood | Pastor Emeritus

21 Curve Street West Newton, MA 02465 | 617.332.5870

Announcements – March 30, 2014

Categories: Announcements,Church,Events,Litany

The Usher Board will meet today following the morning worship service in the Christian Education Center.


During the season of Lent, we will hold weekly prayer conference calls on Wednesdays at 6:00am led by members of our congregation and church leadership. The dial-in number is (605) 562-3000 and passcode is 458869. We will be led in prayer by Deacon Peter Goddard. Don’t miss this opportunity to draw closer to God and one another in prayer!


The Inspirational Chorale will rehearse on Thursday, April 3 at 7:00pm. All choir members are encouraged to attend.


On Saturday, April 5, 2014, the Men’s Ministry will hold their breakfast and meeting beginning at 8:00am in the Ford Fellowship Hall. All men of the church are invited to participate.


Join us on Wednesday, April 9, 2014 at 7:30pm for our next Howard Haywood Lecture Series. The next lecture will be given by Rev. Dr. Gregory Mobley. Dr. Mobley is Professor of Christian Bible at Andover Newton Theological School and serves the congregation of First Baptist Church in Needham. He will be lecturing on “Passing through Samaria: To Lose and Find Ourselves in the Bible”.


Join us as we celebrate the close of the Lenten season and prepare to celebrate the resurrection with our Holy Week services:
Holy Wednesday Foot Washing Service (7:30pm): Guests – Rev. Ellis Washington and the St. Paul AME Church family
Maundy Thursday Tenebrae Service (7:30pm): Service held at Lincoln Park Baptist Church
Good Friday Seven Last Words Service (7:30pm)


Numbered envelopes for members for 2014 are still available for pickup in the church office. Any envelopes remaining on April 20 will be removed and numbers will be put back in circulation in the next distribution cycle. If you would like to retain your number and use your envelopes, please pick them up before April 20. See church collector Bro. Gerald Jones will any questions.


Morning Litany

Leader: We honor the life and legacy of Shirley Chisholm. She was a drum major for justice and an advocate for economic and gender equality.

People: “You don’t make progress by standing on the sidelines and complaining. You make progress by implementing ideas.”

Leader: Shirley Chisholm was the first Black woman to serve in the United States Congress. An early education expert, Shirley Chisholm was elected to the New York Legislature in 1964 and to Congress in 1968. She became one of the founding members of the Congressional Black Caucus in 1969.

People: “We Americans have the chance to become someday a nation in which all radical stocks and classes can exist in their own selfhoods, but meet on a basis of respect and equality and live together, socially, economically and politically.”

Leader: Shirley Chisholm became the first African American woman to make a bid to be President of the United States when she ran for the Democratic nomination in 1972. A champion of minority education and employment opportunities throughout her tenure in Congress, Chisholm was also a vocal opponent of the draft.

ALL: We honor the life and legacy of Shirley Chisholm. She was a drum major for justice and an advocate for economic and gender equality.

The Morning Litany was written by Reverend Carrington Moore.


Myrtle Celebrates Women’s History Month
Shirley Chisholm

Famed U.S. congresswoman and lifelong social activist Shirley Chisholm was born Shirley St. Hill on November 30, 1924, in a predominantly black neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York. Chisholm spent part of her childhood in Barbados with her grandmother. After graduating from Brooklyn College in 1946, she began her career as a teacher and went on to earn a master’s degree in elementary education from Columbia University.

Chisholm served as director of the Hamilton-Madison Child Care Center from 1953 to 1959, and as an educational consultant for New York City’s Bureau of Child Welfare from 1959 to 1964.

In 1968, Shirley Chisholm made history by becoming the United States’ first African-American congresswoman, beginning the first of seven terms in the House of Representatives. After initially being assigned to the House Forestry Committee, she shocked many by demanding reassignment. She was placed on the Veterans’ Affairs Committee, eventually graduating to the Education and Labor Committee. In 1969, Chisholm became one of the founding members of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Chisholm went on to make history yet again, becoming the first major-party African-American candidate to make a bid for the U.S. presidency when she ran for the Democratic nomination in 1972. A champion of minority education and employment opportunities throughout her tenure in Congress, Chisholm was also a vocal opponent of the U.S. military draft. After leaving Congress in 1983, she taught at Mount Holyoke College and was popular on the lecture circuit.

Chisholm was married to Conrad Chisholm from 1949 to 1977. She wed Arthur Hardwick Jr. in 1986. She authored two books during her lifetime, Unbought and Unbossed (1970) and The Good Fight (1973).

Chisholm died on January 1, 2005, at the age of 80, in Ormond Beach (near Daytona Beach), Florida.

“She was our Moses that opened the Red Sea for us,” Robert E. Williams, president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in Flagler County, said of Chisholm in an interview with The Associated Press (January 2, 2005). William Howard, Chisholm’s longtime campaign treasurer, expressed similar sentiments. “Anyone that came in contact with her, they had a feeling of a careness,” Howard said, “and they felt that she was very much a part of each individual as she represented her district.”

http://www.biography.com/people/shirley-chisholm-9247015

Author: myrtlebaptistchurch

Myrtle Baptist Church, founded by freed slaves in 1874, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2008 and exists as one of the oldest black churches in New England.

Leave a Reply